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20121101
20121130
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captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: israel stepped up its military offensive in gaza today and hamas rockets targeted tel aviv in day two of a growing middle east conflict. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the war which has claimed civilian deaths on both sides. >> brown: then, b.p. admits to felony charges and agrees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people w
brown: new details emerge about the affair that led to the resignation of c.i.a. director david petraeus and about when the f.b.i. first uncover evidence of it. good evening. i'm geoffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight we get the latest on the time line as we know it and the implications for the intelligence agency. >> brown: then gay rights add voaks won their first victory at the ballot box last week. ray suarez examines the significance of voters in three states approving same-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about how we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: large parts of new jersey were in ruins today, as it became clear the state bore the brunt of the storm from its coastline to the new york suburbs. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on rescue and recovery efforts in the northeast. plus, hari sreenivasan reports from lower manhattan where shuttered businesses are facing mounting losses. >> brown: then, after a pause from the storm. it was game back-on for the presidential candidates with five days to go before election day. we get an update. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> we need a president who understands business, and i do. that's why i will be able to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challengin
standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.
that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, special correspondent mary kay magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and city dwellers eat twice as much meat on average as those in the countryside. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
: jeffrey brown will be watching the congressional races for us all night. jeff, here's your first pass. >> brown: thank you, and with me is christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothen berg report to help sort through the senate races. let's start with florida, christina. >> none of the races that gwen and judy just mentioned called by the associated press were a big surprise but florida was an opportunity for the republicans. they thought this could end up being close. for a long time, senator nelson has been able to maintain his advantage there, even as the president and mitt romney are basically tied, in part pause he's as you been able to win the conservative democrats in the panhandle area of florida. but also this is just a state that has been so focused on for the presidential race, it hasn't gotten as much attention. >> brown: does it tell us much about the presidential race? >> i don't think so. if you talk to republicanned inners about connie mack's campaign, you get a load of criticism. he didn't raise money. he entered the race late. he didn't put togeth
in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a heal
evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have an on-the-ground report from gaza city, followed by two views of the widening conflict on the third day of hostilities. >> woodruff: then, an update on the syrian war. margaret warner spent the day inside rebel-held territory. >> brown: we get a "battleground dispatch" from megan verlee of colorado public radio. voters in that state approved a ballot initiative allowing anyone over 21 to buy marijuana. >> politicses, businesspeople and law enforcement are wondering what comes next. har >> woodruff: hari sreenivasan talks to andrew kohut about the pew center's post-election report card, with the candidates, the campaigns, and the news media getting low marks. >> brown: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and how much did the presidential candidates spend on social media? ray suarez has some answers on the daily download. >> take a look at this, the obama campaign spent $47 million on digital sending. and the romney campaign spent 4 my 7 million. a 10 to 1 gap.
a deal unless it includes higher taxes on the wealthy. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we'll have excerpts from the president's remarks, and our own debate on the economic challenges ahead with two senators, maryland democrat ben cardin and tennessee republican bob corker. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez has the latest on the surprise resignation of cia chief david petraeus after admitting to an extra-marital affair. >> brown: it's still cold and dark in many new jersey homes. special correspondent rick karr follows utility crews as they work to turn the electricity back on. >> access to these lines is quite difficult, cutting through peoples' backyards. you may come in one and cross four other yards just to get to your job site. >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: intel >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own.
. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was mad
and recreation grounds are submerged in brown, soupy water. and in some warts of this region the only way to get around is by boat. elsewhere, it is just not safe at all. the area affected is just north of rome. here it has been raining for days. the bad weather has swept across italy. in venice, seasonal flooding was higher and more widespread than normal. and unless you were in a gondola, there was little way to stay dry. there the floods are receding. but it is now the waterlogged regions of tuscana and brea that are baring the brunt. "bbc news." >> right now china's ruling communicatist party is meeting in beijing to anoint its new leaders. among the most pressing issues they will face, a territorial dispute with japan that has erupted into the worst crisis interest the two nations in decades. at issue is a group of islands. our correspondent has gone to take a closer look and to see what is fueling all this controversy. >> just after dawn we get our first view of the islands. a jagged huddle of rocks sticking up from the deep blue waters of the east china sea. it has taken 10 hours sailing
, many want to be just like her. dr. gordon brown is hearing about the ambitions people have, many girls never see the inside of the classroom. she risked her life to campaign for girls' education and the united nations is going to carry on that fight. she pledged to campaign for them just before she was shot. >> simply for going to school, wanting to go to school, it is so unspeakable. >> they raise their voices in her honor, a nobel peace prize. the courageous teenager would be a worthy recipient. for more of the global attention her case has drawn, i spoke to the founder of women for women international that joined us from new york. the effect taking place in pakistan, is it possible something positive could come out of her plight? >> i would hope so. she is a representation of the plight of many girls. not only pakistan, but all over the world. a girl is very articulate, clear about what she wants, and within the frame of her culture and religion, is still targeted for assassination for speaking up and wanting to go to school. it triggered something that the terrorists pushed their l
faces challenges around the world -- from the middle east to china. later in the broadcast jeffrey brown of the pbs newshour will look at some critical issues all but been ignored during the campaign. frontline will examine key moments that shaped both candidates' lives when they were young men. political journalists and authors will join gwen ifill on the "washington week" set to discuss how the presidency has transformed many of the men who have won it. and jeff greenfield of "need to know" will weigh in on this question: how can we predict which candidates will become successful presidents? but we begin with a look at the most pressing problems facing the nation today, and how the candidates plan to remedy them. after all, the election is a fundamental a clash of ideas. and no matter who is elected tuesday, those problems are not about to go away soon. judy woodfruff of the pbs newshour kicks off our coverage. >> thanks, hari. from the beginning of the 2012 presidential campaign, probably no issues have received more attention than jobs and taxes. and perhaps no issues matter more to
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13